Gandhi-Yatra

It was Mahatma Gandhi’s dream to see India grow into a strong and secular state, built on the sound principles of amity, non-violence, love and tolerance. He had the vision and wisdom to foresee the ugly situations of communal discord and acrimony which the country is in fact, facing today. Indian politics is mired in communal turbulence and the fires of sectarian violence are being stoked by certain political groups for their own gain.

Unfortunately these days there are a huge number of religious leaders, each propagating a distinct ideology or set of beliefs. What India really needs is a teacher who can elevate society above the differences of caste, creed and community through spirituality. What India needs most today is the renaissance of the spiritual ideals of tolerance, love, compassion, universal brotherhood and, above all humanity, which is the quintessence of all religions.

Shri Satpal Ji Maharaj believes that to salvage the situation, India will once again have to infuse public life with Gandhian philosophy. In order to once again revive these doctrines, Shri Maharaj Ji organised a 'Gandhi Yatra' from Maghar to Lucknow in October 1993. Maghar is the place where St Kabir departed from this world, leaving his Hindu and Muslim followers dumbstruck, so the story goes, when his body disappeared into thin air while they were arguing whether to cremate or bury it.

The 600-odd kilometre route of the Gandhi Yatra was covered in 2 days, with rallies held at Maghar, Mhow, Gazipur, Varanasi, Jaunpur, Sultanpur and finally at Lucknow. In a moving display of support, crowds lined the streets to welcome the marchers. This Yatra culminated in a Sadbhavna Sammelan at Lucknow to convey the message of religious harmony, mutual respect and the universality of God. It was preceded by a silent march by all the participants along the 4km distance from Charbagh to Begum Hazrat Mahal Park.